Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 186 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 261 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

After Gender: Tools for Progressives in a Shift from Sexual Domination to the Economic Family by Janet Halley

When transnational law looks at sex, gender, and sexuality today, what does it identify as “the problem”? I think it is safe to say that the answer is “male domination, in, through, and as sexuality”—that is, the core idea of Catherine A. MacKinnon’s structuralist sexual-subordination feminism (“SSSF” for purposes of this Essay)—complexified somewhat by some cultural feminist inputs, such as the idea that women’s maternal role gives them access to redemptive strategies that men cannot be counted on to understand. The papers collected in this Symposium suggest, however, that this delimitation of “the problem” is itself a problem—that at the very least, the remedial imaginary of transnational law needs to add a concern for the dominations that occur in and as gender (and thus to add a more positive project on behalf of men and masculinity as sites of deprivation and injury) and in and as the repression of nonnormative sexuality (and thus to work on behalf of sexual minorities and erotic liberation generally). I think that many Symposium contributors have the intuition that the SSS feminists “got there first” with their ideas about sexuality as domination, and that we are in a deep game of catch-up. I believe the alliance between structuralist feminists working against male domination through sex and sexuality, on one hand, and social conservatives working to enforce their ideas of sexual morality, on the other, makes us feel outnumbered, outgunned.

Read article here.

Related posts:

  1. Rape in Berlin: Reconsidering the Criminalisation of Rape in the International Law of Armed Conflict by Janet Halley
  2. Rape at Rome: Feminist Interventions in the Criminalization of Sex-Related Violence in Positive International Criminal Law by Janet Halley
  3. Sexual Labors: Interdisciplinary Perspectives Toward Sex as Work by Rhacel Parrenas with Eileen Boris and Stephanie Gilmore
  4. Criminalising Consensual Sexual Behaviour in the Context of HIV: Consequences, Evidence and Leadership by Aziza Ahmed
  5. On the Frontlines: Gender, War, and the Post-Conflict Process by Dina Haynes