Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 186 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 261 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

Beyond a Snapshot: Preventing Human Trafficking in the Global Economy by Janie Chuang

Current legal responses to the problem of human trafficking often reflect a deep reluctance to address the socioeconomic root causes of the problem. Because they approach trafficking as an act (or series of acts) of violence, most responses focus predominantly on prosecuting traffickers, and to a lesser extent, protecting trafficked persons. While such approaches might account for the consequences of trafficking, they tend to overlook the broader socioeconomic reality that drives trafficking in human beings. Against this backdrop, this article seeks to reframe trafficking as a migratory response to current globalizing socioeconomic trends. It argues that, to be effective, counter-trafficking strategies must target the underlying conditions that impel people to accept dangerous labor migration assignments. The article recommends that existing counter-trafficking strategies be assessed with a view to assessing their potential for long-term effectiveness. It also advocates strategic use of the nondiscrimination principle to promote basic economic, social, and cultural rights, the deprivation of which has sustained the trafficking phenomenon.

Beyond a Snapshot: Human Trafficking and the Politics of Labor Migration in a Globalized Economy 

Related posts:

  1. Achieving Accountability for Migrant Domestic Worker Abuse by Janie Chuang
  2. What’s Wrong with Prostitution? What’s Right with Sex Work? Comparing Markets in Female Sexual Labor by Elizabeth Bernstein
  3. Introduction to Special Issue: Sexual Commerce and the Global Flow of Bodies, Desires, and Social Policies by Elizabeth Bernstein
  4. WHAT‟S THE BORDER GOT TO DO WITH IT? HOW IMMIGRATION REGIMES AFFECT FAMILIAL CARE PROVISION—A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS by Hila Shamir