Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 186 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-content/plugins/post-types-order/post-types-order.php on line 261 and defined in /nfs/c09/h04/mnt/135546/domains/traffickingroundtable.org/html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 1197

Trafficking in Human Beings: the Slavery that Surounds Us by Ann Jordan

At the end of the last century, the world witnessed the growth of a modern form of slavery — trafficking in human beings. These modern traffickers treat women, men and children as commodities to abuse, sell, and move across borders like illegal drugs or stolen weapons. Modern traffickers have many faces. They are diplomats who import domestic workers and hold them in isolation and forced labor in their homes.1 They are members of organized criminal networks that move people into forced prostitution. Some of them are men who import foreign-born women, ostensibly for marriage, but in reality for the purpose of holding them in servitude and subjecting them to sexual abuse. Others are families that import men, women, and children to work in forced labor in their offices, factories, and homes, and subject them to sexual and physical assault. Traffickers, then, are our nextdoor neighbors. Their victims are all around us. They force their victims to cook our food in neighborhood restaurants or in their own homes, sew our clothes or pick today’s fresh vegetables. They could even be the foreignborn “wife” of a co-worker, or the woman held in isolation in forced prostitution in a quiet neighborhood.

The Slavery the Surrounds Us 

Related posts:

  1. Fact or fiction: what do we really know about human trafficking? by Ann Jordan
  2. Slavery, forced labor, debt bondage, and human trafficking: from conceptional confusion to targeted solutions by Ann Jordan
  3. Human Trafficking and Globalization by Ann Jordan
  4. Good Intentions are Not Enough: Four Recommendations for Implementing the Trafficking Victims Protection Act by Dina Haynes
  5. USING INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW TO BETTER PROTECT VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING: THE PROHIBITIONS ON SLAVERY, SERVITUDE FORCED LABOR AND DEBT BONDAGE by Anne Gallagher