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What’s Wrong with Prostitution? What’s Right with Sex Work? Comparing Markets in Female Sexual Labor by Elizabeth Bernstein

This article stems from an interest in some of the recent debates in American feminist theory over sexuality and empowerment.  By the late eighties, participants in the already polarized “sexuality debates” had formed two clearly demarcated camps around such policy issues as pornography and prostitution, and around the underlying questions of power, resistance and the possibility of female sexual agency under patriarchy. While the figure of the prostitute has served as a key trope in the writings and arguments of both groups–as symbolic of either the expropriation of female sexuality in general, or alternatively, of its socially subversive reappropriation–there has been surprisingly little empirical research done to investigate the lived conditions of contemporary prostitution.

What’s Wrong with Prostitution–What’s Right with Sex Work 

Related posts:

  1. The Transformation of Sexual Commerce and Urban Space in San Francisco by Elizabeth Bernstein
  2. The Sexual Politics of the “New Abolitionism” by Elizabeth Bernstein
  3. Introduction to Special Issue: Sexual Commerce and the Global Flow of Bodies, Desires, and Social Policies by Elizabeth Bernstein
  4. Sex for the Middle Classes by Elizabeth Bernstein
  5. Militarized Humanitarianism Meets Carceral Feminism: The Politics of Sex, Rights, and Freedom in Contemporary Antitrafficking Campaigns by Elizabeth Bernstein