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Check Out New Scholarship in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

Two roundtable members, Denise Brennan and Dina Francesca Haynes, recently published articles in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (May 2014) edited by Ronald Weitzer and Sheldon X. Zhang. See the full Table of Contents for  additional scholarship on recent empirical research on human trafficking.

Trafficking, Scandal, and Abuse of Migrant Workers in Argentina and the United States by Denise Brennan (Abstract)

This article examines the varied consequences that the label “trafficked” holds for migrants and for the organizations that assist them. In the case of migrants from the Dominican Republic to Argentina, threat of U.S. economic sanctions prompted the two governments to document incidents of trafficking by labeling all forms of migrant labor exploitation as trafficking. Collapsing a range of coerced and noncoerced labor experiences under one label has muddied the definition of trafficking. In contrast, U.S. trafficking policy systematically ignores significant exploitation of labor migrants, in part because of the volatile politics of immigration in the United States, and because of the conflation of sex trafficking with trafficking. The article uses these two examples of the effects of labeling exploited workers as trafficking victims to draw attention to the politicization of the term “trafficking.

The Celebritization of Human Trafficking by Dina Francesca Haynes (Abstract)

Human trafficking, and especially sex trafficking, is not only susceptible to alluring and sensational narratives, it also plays into the celebrity-as-rescuer ideal that receives considerable attention from the media, the public, and policy-makers. While some celebrities develop enough expertise to speak with authority on the topic, many others are neither knowledgeable nor accurate in their efforts to champion antitrafficking causes. Prominent policy-makers allow celebrity activists to influence their opinions and even consult with them for advice regarding public policies. Emblematic of larger, fundamental problems with the dominant discourse, funding allocations, and legislation in current antitrafficking initiatives in the United States and elsewhere, celebrity activism is not significantly advancing the eradication of human trafficking and may even be doing harm by diverting attention from aspects of the problem and solution that sorely require attention. 

Related posts:

  1. The Celebrification of Human Trafficking, Part III
  2. The Celebrification of Human Trafficking, Part 1 (in a Six Part Series)
  3. The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and Institutionalization of a Moral Crusade
  4. Competing Claims of Victimhood? Foreign and Domestic Victims of Trafficking in the United States by Denise Brennan
  5. Janie Chuang, American University Washington College of Law