Disciplining Globalization: International Law, Illegal Trade, and the Case of Narcotics by Chantal Thomas

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Our Scholarship, Scholarship | Comments Off

This Article is the first in a series of studies of the globalization of illicit markets. My theses are as follows: First, the increase in international trade in illicit products and services parallels the growth in international trade more generally that accompanies the phenomenon of globalization. Second, at the same time that most international trade law has moved toward a posture of liberalization, there has been a movement to strengthen the prohibition and punishment of trade in illicit...

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Globalization and the Reproduction of Hierarchy by Chantal Thomas

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Over the past decade, the federal government has increasingly taken steps to lift barriers to trade and financial flows into and out of the United States. This liberalization of U.S. economic barriers has been mirrored by similar efforts of governments around the world. These steps, together with gains in technology, have ushered in an era of “globalization.”‘ The global liberalization of economic flows, according to classical economic theory, should maximize the efficient...

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Law and Neoclassical Economic Development: Toward an Institutionalist Critique of Institutionalism by Chantal Thomas

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In his 1993 Nobel Laureate lecture, the leading theorist of institutional economics, Douglass North, emphasized the relevance of his life’s work for economic development policy… Part One  and Part Two

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Critical Directions in Comparative Family Law: Genealogies and Contemporary Studies of Family Law Exceptionalism by Janet Halley and Kerry Rittich

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This is an Introduction to a Special Issue of the American Journal of Comparative Law, edited by Janet Halley. The central theme of the Special Issue is “family law exceptionalism”: the myriad ways in which the family and its law are deemed, either descriptively or normatively, to be special. We argue that the nineteenth century emergence of Family Law as a distinct legal topic, influenced inter alia by Friedrich Carl von Savigny and carried around the world as part of the influence...

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The Future of Law and Development: Second Generation Reforms and the Incorporation of the Social by Kerry Rittich

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One of the most significant events in the field of development in recent years has been the effort to incorporate social concerns into the mainstream agenda of market reform and economic development… Part One  and  Part Two

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Black Sites: Locating the Family and Family Law in Development by Kerry Rittich

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While the family as an economic institution has traditionally been sidelined in development policy, development institutions like the World Bank now promote a range of legal and policy reforms that touch on the family and the household. This Article considers how interventions designed to expand formal markets and to encourage participation in markets and investments in human capital might provoke change within the family and the household. Although they aim to increase welfare by increasing...

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