The Coercion of Trafficked Workers by Kathleen Kim

Posted by on Sep 27, 2013 in Finding the Frame, Politics of Language, Scholarship | Comments Off

Theories of coercion exist across multiple disciplines to explicate the ability of one actor, the coercer, to diminish the free will of another, the coercee, in the absence of overt physical force. A valid claim of coercion places legal blame on the coercer or relinquishes the coercee from legal responsibility for a coerced act or omission. Defining the point at which coercion occurs, however, is the conceptually more difficult task. Recently, coercion has emerged as a significant source of...

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The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and Institutionalization of a Moral Crusade

Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Scholarship | Comments Off

By Ronald Weizer Abstract The issue of sex trafficking has become increasingly politicized in recent years due to the efforts of an influential moral crusade. This article examines the social construction of sex trafficking (and prostitution more generally) in the discourse of leading activists and organizations within the crusade, and concludes that the central claims are problematic, unsubstantiated, or demonstrably false. The analysis documents the increasing endorsement and...

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The Mythology of Prostitution: Advocacy Research and Public Policy

Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Scholarship | Comments Off

By Ronald Weitzer Abstract Over the past decade, public policies on prostitution and other types of sex work have been increasingly contested, both in academia and in popular debates. One perspective, the oppression paradigm, is increasingly reflected in media reporting on the sex industry and is steadily being articulated by government officials in the USA, Europe, and elsewhere. The proliferation of myths based on the oppression paradigm is responsible for the rise of a resurgent...

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Sex trafficking and the sex industry: The need for evidence-based theory and legislation

Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Scholarship | Comments Off

By Ronald Weitzer From the introduction: Under U.S. law, sex trafficking is defined as “the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act.”1 To be punishable, the offense must involve a “severe form” of trafficking involving (1) a person under age eighteen who has been induced to perform a commercial sex act or (2) an adult who has been so induced by the use of “force, fraud, or coercion.”2 Adults who sell sex...

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Disciplining Globalization: International Law, Illegal Trade, and the Case of Narcotics by Chantal Thomas

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Our Scholarship, Scholarship | Comments Off

This Article is the first in a series of studies of the globalization of illicit markets. My theses are as follows: First, the increase in international trade in illicit products and services parallels the growth in international trade more generally that accompanies the phenomenon of globalization. Second, at the same time that most international trade law has moved toward a posture of liberalization, there has been a movement to strengthen the prohibition and punishment of trade in illicit...

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Globalization and the Reproduction of Hierarchy by Chantal Thomas

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Our Scholarship, Scholarship | Comments Off

Over the past decade, the federal government has increasingly taken steps to lift barriers to trade and financial flows into and out of the United States. This liberalization of U.S. economic barriers has been mirrored by similar efforts of governments around the world. These steps, together with gains in technology, have ushered in an era of “globalization.”‘ The global liberalization of economic flows, according to classical economic theory, should maximize the efficient...

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